Travels for the Body and Mind

Explore Your World with Smaller Earth
Although I'm sure this goes without saying, since you found me on tumblr: I'm such a geek. Like, more than I should be probably by this point in my life (I'm 26). My home is the great state of West Virginia in the USA (but don't let that deter you please, we know we have problems but I love it anyway). I love cats, and the great outdoors, and interesting characters, both fictional and non. So that's pretty much what you'll find in here - the things I've discovered on my physical and internet journeys that I find interesting.

Oh ya, and adorable pictures of my (demon) cat...
View from Gatlinburg TN hotel room. Break from the tent during the hail storm.

View from Gatlinburg TN hotel room. Break from the tent during the hail storm.

visitheworld:

An alpine flat on the sabine-travers circuit in Nelson lakes national park, New Zealand (by s.v.e.n.).

visitheworld:

An alpine flat on the sabine-travers circuit in Nelson lakes national park, New Zealand (by s.v.e.n.).

(via fuckyeahhiking)

Cleanup continues in WV. View on my way home from work the other day. Still hard to imagine how many trees there were there a few weeks ago.

Cleanup continues in WV. View on my way home from work the other day. Still hard to imagine how many trees there were there a few weeks ago.

fuckyeahhiking:

Lake Harris | Routeburn Track | Fiordland | New Zealand. remonstrance

fuckyeahhiking:

Lake Harris | Routeburn Track | Fiordland | New Zealand. remonstrance

glashtyn:

Happiness is the memory of old trips and the anticipation of new ones.

anyplace where you can get jalapenos and bbq on a hotdog or a burger bigger than your head is my kinda joint

glashtyn:

Happiness is the memory of old trips and the anticipation of new ones.

anyplace where you can get jalapenos and bbq on a hotdog or a burger bigger than your head is my kinda joint

(via glashtyn-deactivated20120505)

kateelizabethfowler:

Life moves too quickly- in wonderful and tragic ways.
Just last weekend we were in Nitro, West Virginia, beginning a new documentary on Monsanto’s shameless exploitation of the land and the human lives that inhabit it. We spoke with many residents of the town and found that there was a strong divide between the people who felt like they’d been taken advantage of and ignored, versus the people that felt that Monsanto was responsible for the food on their tables and the roof over their heads for over 60 years.
I was deeply impacted by two people in particular, a husband and wife, who were part of a class action lawsuit against Monsanto.They’ve both had cancer and have lost many family members.. they owe tens of thousands of dollars in medical expenses so far this year, with more chemo treatments and hospital visits looming in the near future.
While interviewing them in their home, I asked if they thought anything would happen with the lawsuit.
They said, “I think there’s a very slim chance that we’ll get anything.”
I asked, “If you do- how much would they have to give to make this okay for you and the town?”
The wife responded, “I don’t know if any amount of money could make it right- the lives lost, and the Dioxin that is still in the soil and homes to this day.. I’m not sure that people would want to let Monsanto into their homes to check for the poison, anyways. If they do find Dioxin in our homes, they’ll be worth nothing. People don’t have enough money to purchase new homes, to start over.”
Today Monsanto settled the class action lawsuit, offering to pay $90,000,000.00 in reparations.. which gives me joy, and hope! Not because I feel like Monsanto is finally confessing to their crimes, or that this symbolizes the end of their corrupt practices. I know that Monsanto was responding to the gravity of this lawsuit and that this was just an intelligent business decision: to pay as little money as they could get away with to silence these people- and that’s exactly what this is- a gag in the mouths of the sick, the homeless and the grieving.
They cannot take credit for my joy.
It comes from my small glimpse into these people’s lives- to see their suffering and the fear of their increasing debt load, and then to see it temporarily lifted from their shoulders. To know that Bonnie and Mike are home tonight, together, celebrating.
But there’s tomorrow- and the fact that Mike’s face will continue to be deformed from the invasive and radical reconstructive surgery, that Bonnie still has a rare and deadly form of breast cancer, the medications, the loss of their siblings, their parents and the friends they made in high school. The poison in their furniture, walls and the floorboards beneath their feet- the poison which has lain dormant in their children their entire lives.
Wonderful things have happened today, yet they’re tragic. We should not have to celebrate the fact that Monsanto is finally agreeing to clean the poison from the soil that these people live off of, from the homes that they built and have cared for for generations and the bodies that have already been ravaged by illness and sorrow.
We have to keep caring, challenging and fighting! Don’t forget the losses these people have encountered, and that they only represent a tiny degree of what the people of our country experience every single day because of Monsanto and other greedy corporations.
I’m going to continue this documentary- only to show Monsanto that this will not be swept under the rug.

kateelizabethfowler:

Life moves too quickly- in wonderful and tragic ways.

Just last weekend we were in Nitro, West Virginia, beginning a new documentary on Monsanto’s shameless exploitation of the land and the human lives that inhabit it. We spoke with many residents of the town and found that there was a strong divide between the people who felt like they’d been taken advantage of and ignored, versus the people that felt that Monsanto was responsible for the food on their tables and the roof over their heads for over 60 years.

I was deeply impacted by two people in particular, a husband and wife, who were part of a class action lawsuit against Monsanto.They’ve both had cancer and have lost many family members.. they owe tens of thousands of dollars in medical expenses so far this year, with more chemo treatments and hospital visits looming in the near future.

While interviewing them in their home, I asked if they thought anything would happen with the lawsuit.

They said, “I think there’s a very slim chance that we’ll get anything.”

I asked, “If you do- how much would they have to give to make this okay for you and the town?”

The wife responded, “I don’t know if any amount of money could make it right- the lives lost, and the Dioxin that is still in the soil and homes to this day.. I’m not sure that people would want to let Monsanto into their homes to check for the poison, anyways. If they do find Dioxin in our homes, they’ll be worth nothing. People don’t have enough money to purchase new homes, to start over.”

Today Monsanto settled the class action lawsuit, offering to pay $90,000,000.00 in reparations.. which gives me joy, and hope! Not because I feel like Monsanto is finally confessing to their crimes, or that this symbolizes the end of their corrupt practices. I know that Monsanto was responding to the gravity of this lawsuit and that this was just an intelligent business decision: to pay as little money as they could get away with to silence these people- and that’s exactly what this is- a gag in the mouths of the sick, the homeless and the grieving.

They cannot take credit for my joy.

It comes from my small glimpse into these people’s lives- to see their suffering and the fear of their increasing debt load, and then to see it temporarily lifted from their shoulders. To know that Bonnie and Mike are home tonight, together, celebrating.

But there’s tomorrow- and the fact that Mike’s face will continue to be deformed from the invasive and radical reconstructive surgery, that Bonnie still has a rare and deadly form of breast cancer, the medications, the loss of their siblings, their parents and the friends they made in high school. The poison in their furniture, walls and the floorboards beneath their feet- the poison which has lain dormant in their children their entire lives.

Wonderful things have happened today, yet they’re tragic. We should not have to celebrate the fact that Monsanto is finally agreeing to clean the poison from the soil that these people live off of, from the homes that they built and have cared for for generations and the bodies that have already been ravaged by illness and sorrow.

We have to keep caring, challenging and fighting! Don’t forget the losses these people have encountered, and that they only represent a tiny degree of what the people of our country experience every single day because of Monsanto and other greedy corporations.

I’m going to continue this documentary- only to show Monsanto that this will not be swept under the rug.

featherloom:

wilwheaton:

laughterkey:

markcoatney:

shortformblog:

In which an image and headline juxtapose so painfully that you want to pull out your hair.

Years ago I was a guest on Kasich’s Fox show. We were doing a year in review thing, and at the end of it he asked me: “So Mark: Floods, Tsunamis, Hurricanes. Some would say that this is God’s judgement on the world. What do you think?”
Clearly, we know his answer.

Fuck everything about this.

Innocent people are going to suffer even more than they already are, because Kasich cares more about his crazy ideology than people, and that infuriates me.

D: This is so sad.  Though I am happy Steve Beshear is our governor and not too proud to ask for desperately needed help.

featherloom:

wilwheaton:

laughterkey:

markcoatney:

shortformblog:

In which an image and headline juxtapose so painfully that you want to pull out your hair.

Years ago I was a guest on Kasich’s Fox show. We were doing a year in review thing, and at the end of it he asked me: “So Mark: Floods, Tsunamis, Hurricanes. Some would say that this is God’s judgement on the world. What do you think?”

Clearly, we know his answer.

Fuck everything about this.

Innocent people are going to suffer even more than they already are, because Kasich cares more about his crazy ideology than people, and that infuriates me.

D: This is so sad.  Though I am happy Steve Beshear is our governor and not too proud to ask for desperately needed help.

If you are in or around West Liberty, Kentucky, please let me know

featherloom:

sleepyholler:

I’m trying to help a friend of my sister locate her elderly father.  His name is Paul Prater and has a daughter named Sonja.   He lives on Cow Branch Road in West Liberty and has not been able to contact him.  If you know of shelters open in the area, please let me know.

Thank you and PLEASE REBLOG.

Can anybody help?

hippie-aura:

veganskinnybitch:

nycfitbunny:

Check this out! It’s the same golden delicious apple. The apple to the  left was grown in NY State, and the apple to the right was grown somewhere in the U.S. The amish farmer I got my apples from didn’t speak english  :( so I didn’t get to ask him any questions. BUT, when in doubt and your  produce has a sticker— this is how to read it!
If your produce has 4 digits starting with a 3 or 4, it means the produce was  conventionally grown. The produce was sprayed with  weed killers and chemical pesticides, meaning it was “conventionally grown, but not organic.”
If it has 5 digits, and begins with a 9, it means that the produce was organically grown. You can be sure that this produce was  not treated  with any chemicals.
A 5 digit code that begins with an 8 indicates that the produce was genetically modified (man intervened by manipulating the genes to  produce a  larger or brighter colored food). This produce may have been  chemically  treated.

Always reblog for you guys.

yes! i love finding stuff like this :D

hippie-aura:

veganskinnybitch:

nycfitbunny:

Check this out! It’s the same golden delicious apple. The apple to the left was grown in NY State, and the apple to the right was grown somewhere in the U.S. The amish farmer I got my apples from didn’t speak english :( so I didn’t get to ask him any questions. BUT, when in doubt and your produce has a sticker— this is how to read it!

  • If your produce has 4 digits starting with a 3 or 4, it means the produce was  conventionally grown. The produce was sprayed with weed killers and chemical pesticides, meaning it was “conventionally grown, but not organic.”
  • If it has 5 digits, and begins with a 9, it means that the produce was organically grown. You can be sure that this produce was not treated with any chemicals.
  • A 5 digit code that begins with an 8 indicates that the produce was genetically modified (man intervened by manipulating the genes to produce a larger or brighter colored food). This produce may have been chemically treated.

Always reblog for you guys.

yes! i love finding stuff like this :D

(via piratevikings-deactivated201305)

lesserjoke:

Descriptivists of the world, feel free to use this as a response to language criticism whenever you see fit!

lesserjoke:

Descriptivists of the world, feel free to use this as a response to language criticism whenever you see fit!

(via featherloom)

The view from Liberty Mountain in Lynchburg,VA earlier today. Visiting my brother. Decided this was a good time to remember that I care about other things in life besides work and come back to tumblr. Inspired by lovely mountain views and good company :)

The view from Liberty Mountain in Lynchburg,VA earlier today. Visiting my brother. Decided this was a good time to remember that I care about other things in life besides work and come back to tumblr. Inspired by lovely mountain views and good company :)

Catan freebies. 

We also picked up paper game boards for setters for Delaware, Maryland, virginia, and west Virginia.

Catan freebies.

We also picked up paper game boards for setters for Delaware, Maryland, virginia, and west Virginia.

Setters of Catan resource plushies!! Brick, sheep, and rock. So cute - won today by my husband at Charcon game convention.

Setters of Catan resource plushies!! Brick, sheep, and rock. So cute - won today by my husband at Charcon game convention.